Posts Tagged ‘the artist’

The Artist (2011)

February 26, 2012

[rating:5]

I have enjoyed several silent movies, mostly german expressionistic melodramas from the 20’s 30’s. Watching “The Artist” on screen is almost magical for never in my life I thought I could experience a silent movie on the big silver screen in a cinema. The title card and the fact that it’s a silent movie almost play like a novelty like “Oh it’s the first 3D movie!” and I kept asking questions like “How long can this go on without the dialogues?” However, the movie would not work solely on the gimmick if the story and performance were not so movingly touching!

George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is a famous silent movie star of his time, he meets Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo) during his movie’s premier. She is a good dancer with a hopeful future, George creates the beauty mark on her face that will become her signature. Things go well for George until talkies replace silent movies. Fresh talking faces replace old silent faces. Peppy Miller goes on to become the famous talkie star, and George loses his fame and retreats to a smaller apartment with his loyal puppy.

Like all the classic silent movies that age well, “The Artist” is a melodrama. Without the dialogues, the movie has to work on the visual languages, facial expressions, music, and occasional title cards that explain the plot. The movie succeeds largely due to the performance of Jean Dujardin as George Valentin. He plays the role so convincingly that he could have been a very successful silent actor indeed. He has the perfect comical timing, and can be melodramatically touching when required.

Great silent movie directors also prided themselves for using as few title cards as possible to tell the story only with the images (Murnau’s “The Last Laugh 1924″ is title card free). Director Michel Hazanavicius could stand proudly next to the silent movie titans like F.W. Murnau for he too achieves this ability. The format forces the director to work really hard on the visual languages that the story speaks to the audience on an abstract level, stripping down to the essence: the abstract idea of loss, love, joy, sadness, depression.

You may find yourself reluctant to watch a silent movie, but you will be surprised to find yourself more emotionally involved than watching a talkie. When I watched “Up!” made by Pixar, I was so touched by the 10 minutes of fast forwarding “silent sequence” at the beginning, that I did not care about the rest. I heard most people who watched “Up!” felt the same way. The success of “The Artist” shows that the audience desperately needs not 3D or computer generated monsters, but a movie that is able to hook the audience and tell a good story.

“The Artist” ends with a short scene containing spoken dialogues, that almost feels like a let down if it doesn’t remind us the beautiful silence before this scene so well. It almost feels like waking up from a beautiful dream.

The Artist is directed by Michel Hazanavicius, starring Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo.